Central California Union Consultants Charged with Fraud

In California, selling workers compensation insurance requires a license. The business practices of Marcus Asay and Antonio Gastelum would seem to justify such a requirement. On September 24, Asay, founder of a Fresno-area firm, American Labor Alliance, and Gastelum, a former principal officer of the alliance, were charged in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California in a 19-count superseding indictment on fraud and money laundering charges related to their financial products. In 2018 the California Department of Insurance had penalized the company and certain affiliates by more than $4.3 million. The latest action follows in the wake of an amended civil suit filed by a Fresno employer. The defendants deny all wrongdoing. The charges follow a probe by the FBI, the IRS, the Social Security Administration and the Department of Labor.

American Labor Alliance (ALA), launched in 2007, doesn’t actually look like a union. But that’s what … Read More ➡

AFSCME Local in California Forges Worker’s Signature, Wins Court Dismissal

It is now settled law that public employees cannot be forced to pay dues to a union as a condition of employment. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Local 3930 and the State of California don’t seem convinced. Neither does a federal judge. On June 15, a U.S. District Court for the Central District of California rebuked an Orange County home care provider, Maria Quezambra, in her quest to recoup dues collected by the union via the State of California over six years despite clear evidence that someone at the union had forged her signature to establish membership. A week later, she filed an appeal. The larger issue, in light of the Supreme Court’s 2018 ruling in Janus v. AFSCME Council 31, is the corrupt practice of government agencies allying themselves with the very unions with whom they bargain.     

The U.S. Supreme Court’s Janus decision was … Read More ➡

California to Impose Gender Quotas on Businesses?

Mandatory “gender equity” on corporate boards may seem a far-fetched idea, but in one state it soon may become law. Several weeks ago, the California legislature passed a bill, SB 826, that would require every public company headquartered in the state to have at least one woman on its board of directors by the end of 2019. Larger companies also would have to place at least two women on their boards by the end of 2021. There would be stiff fines for noncompliance. The bill awaits the signature of Gov. Jerry Brown (in photo). It’s yet another example of how affirmative action is driven by political shaming, not by sensible economics or constitutional law.

Feminists long have set their sights on breaking the “glass ceiling,” that metaphorical barrier established by male employers to discourage women from advancing to top positions. As a corrective, these activists increasingly are calling for requiring … Read More ➡