What's Hot
11/22/2013 - 10:34

Volt and AkersonI have to hand it to General Motors and those Chevy Volt supporters who continue to come up with creative ways to espouse the virtues of the slow selling and heavily subsidized vehicle. They just won't give up. The latest figures being presented in political fashion utilize large numbers that, on the surface, appear impressive. When analyzed, the figures give more insight into just how much taxpayer money is being wasted on green subsidies, particularly on electric vehicles (EVs). Sound the trumpets! According to Green Car Reports, the Chevy Volt has saved 17 million gallons of gas to date.

2,646 reads
11/20/2013 - 11:30

solar panelsThe survival of wind and solar energy, like electric vehicles, is wholly dependent on coerced wealth transfers by government from the private sector (i.e., taxpayers) to the renewable industry. This distorted “economic sector” could only exist under political practices such as Communism at worst, and crony-favoring corporate welfare at best.

2,013 reads
11/18/2013 - 10:34

Obama and MuskTesla CEO, Elon Musk, seems to have reached cult status with green ideologues, as well as with many in the media. Musk's name often goes hand in hand with descriptive monikers like "visionary" and "genius." Of course, what Musk is really a genius at is getting politicians to fund his private businesses ventures with taxpayer money so they don't have to make a profit.

It might be time to step back and ponder just how genius Musk's latest idea is; which is for Tesla to compete with Ford's best selling F-series trucks by offering up an electric pickup truck.

2,405 reads
11/13/2013 - 19:22

Home care worker and patient State governments are becoming effective union organizers. Several employees in Illinois, unhappy over the prospect of being forced to subsidize such an arrangement, are pushing back. And they've got themselves an audience at the highest level. On October 1, the Supreme Court agreed to hear an appeal by a group of home care providers objecting to an executive order issued in 2009 by Illinois Democratic Governor Pat Quinn that reclassified their status as "state employee," so as to bring them under union representation. The class-action case, known as Harris v. Quinn, will test the High Court's willingness to build on its Knox v. SEIU ruling of last year, which held that a California Service Employees union could not force covered nonunion employees to pay fees to support its political activism.

2,611 reads
11/12/2013 - 17:08

American Argentine moneyThe United States is broke. The federal government has to borrow 40% of each dollar it spends. We send billions to lending institutions, most of all, the World Bank, to which the American taxpayer is the biggest contributor. Yet this debt load may be on the verge of increasing. The government of Argentina currently is demanding a $3 billion loan from the World Bank. Argentina makes for an unreliable debtor. Burdened by decades of corruption, nationalization and devaluation, Argentina has a long history of refusing to pay its debts.

20,469 reads
11/08/2013 - 18:25

Rep. Melvin WattNorth Carolina Democratic Congressman Melvin Watt has a dream job: running a federal agency that controls around $5 trillion in financial assets. For now, he'll have to keep dreaming about it. On October 31, the Senate, by a 57-41 margin, fell three votes shy of the 60 votes needed to invoke cloture (i.e., end debate) over President Obama's nomination of Watt as director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, which for over five years has been conservator for mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Republicans, with two exceptions, voted to filibuster, believing he wasn't qualified to run the agency. Yet the main problem with Watt is less his qualifications than his view that FHFA should be a permanent agency, and one with favoritism toward nonwhites.

3,288 reads
11/08/2013 - 10:43

Tesla Tenn fireFires, faulty drive units, financial losses and stock price deflation marked Tesla Motors news in a week that seemed as bad as the last couple of years were good.

Fortunately for CEO Elon Musk and his support staff he’s mastered the art of celebri-preneur showmanship that he’s built enough standing with the media to endure a really bad week. The multi-billionaire who’s dazzled with innovation at Paypal, SpaceX and SolarCity will be permitted his stumbles because of his track record and his self-assurance. Henrik Fisker, whose taxpayer-backed luxury electric auto company didn’t get nearly the same favor, must be jealous.

3,254 reads
11/06/2013 - 15:23

Carnahan Wind Deal coverIn this 23-page report, NLPC Associate Fellow Fred N. Sauer looks at Wind Capital Group (WCG), a St. Louis-based company that has been the recipient of Obama administration stimulus funding, as well as other significant tax credits and subsidies.

WCG was founded in 2005 by Tom Carnahan, son of the late Missouri Democratic Governor Mel Carnahan and his widow, former Missouri Senator Jean Carnahan. He also is the brother of former Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan and former Congressman Russ Carnahan.

2,754 reads
11/06/2013 - 02:00

Blink chargerAfter an Inspector General’s audit earlier this year of now-bankrupt electric vehicle charging company Ecotality, which determined that millions of taxpayer dollars were wasted in a nearly unworkable program, the IG has returned with findings that the Department of Energy withheld information about the project’s problems during his first investigation.

The audit, released by DOE IG Gregory Friedman in July, determined (among other things) that the persistent weak demand for electric vehicles harmed the deployment and timeliness of a $135 million-plus taxpayer funded charging network, which led to excessive grants and project expansion that became virtually unusable under the grants’ guidelines. Investigators discovered that conditions for reimbursement to Ecotality for the EV charging demonstration project were “very generous” and that cost-sharing requirements were extremely lenient.

2,752 reads
11/05/2013 - 10:20

Volt and AkersonGeneral Motors had another disappointing month of sales for its much-hyped green wonder-car in October. Sales for the Chevy Volt plunged over 31 percent from last year, down to 2,022 units for the month. To put that number in perspective, Toyota sells that many Toyota Camrys in about two days. Or, GM is selling less than one Volt per Chevy dealership per month.

3,516 reads
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