Supreme Court Clears Way for Menendez Bribery Trial

The Supreme Court has refused to dismiss criminal charges against Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ) who sought to have them thrown out on Constitutional grounds. Menendez was indicted, in part, on the basis of information uncovered by the National Legal and Policy Center.

Menendez seems to think that the Speech or Debate Clause is actually the Solicitation and Bribery Clause. His trial will start in the fall, two and half years after he was indicted. In this case, justice delayed really is justice denied. Although Menendez has stepped down as the ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, he arrogantly refuses to resign from the Senate. He is even raising money for a 2018 reelection campaign.

This is the third time courts have rejected Menendez attempts to have the indictments thrown out. On September 13, 2016, a Philadelphia-based appeals court refused, a ruling that Menendez appealed to the Supreme Court.…

South Carolina Boeing Workers Reject Machinists Union Representation

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) has never lacked for persistence.  But after more than seven years of trying to organize workers at the Boeing assembly plant in North Charleston, S.C., it has little choice right now but to lay low.  On February 15, three-fourths of the employees at the facility, which builds the Boeing Dreamliner 787 commercial jet, voted against union representation.  The vote also represents a rebuke to the National Labor Relations Board, which back in December 2011 dropped an Unfair Labor Practices complaint against the company in the wake of an IAM victory in contract talks.  Significantly, the vote came one day before a visit by President Donald Trump, who has made domestic manufacturing a top priority issue.

Union Corruption Update covered this test of wills more than once in 2011, explaining the implications of the South Carolina situation for labor-management relations throughout …

Trump Asked to Recover $11.4 Billion Lost on General Motors Bailout if Automaker Moves Production to China

Today I asked President Trump to seek repayment from General Motors of the $11.4 billion taxpayers lost on bailing out the company if it persists in moving its production to China, and in strengthening its relationship with the Shanghai Automotive Industry Corporation. According to President Obama, the rationale for the bailout was to help save American manufacturing jobs.

Here’s the text of my letter, which was copied to Dr. Peter Navarro, director of his National Trade Council:

During your campaign, you spoke of the importance of cutting better economic deals for Americans. In particular, you and many of your advisors have pointed out the massive trade deficit with China, produced in part by American companies that close their American factories, open up shop in China and then import their formerly American-made products into America.

While there may be reasonable arguments about the extent to which government should intervene in trade, …

Major Corporations Weigh In on Transgender Agenda Again

Marc Benioff

Major corporations continue to spend precious time and resources in support of radical leftist pressure groups and advancing their agenda, rather than trying to maximize their revenues in ways that don’t politically divide their customer base.

The latest example is a friend-of-the-court brief filed with the U.S. Supreme Court in support of a transgender student in Gloucester County, Virginia, who sued her school board because they would not allow her to use the men’s restroom at her high school. “Gavin” Grimm won at the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals, but the Supreme Court stayed the decision until it could hear the case. Yesterday – after the Trump Justice Department reversed former President Obama’s policy guidance on the Title IX discrimination law upon which the case was based – the Supreme Court dropped Grimm’s lawsuit from its schedule, and remanded the case back to the 4th Circuit …

Rep. Gregory Meeks, Congress’ Most Corrupt, Tests Ethics Enforcement

Although he has plenty of competition, Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-NY) is generally regarded by watchdog groups as the most corrupt member of Congress. From Allen Stanford’s Ponzi schemes to Azerbaijan junkets to the unfolding House IT scandal, it seems like Meeks doesn’t miss a chance to get in on shady dealings.

Whether he can survive in office much longer will be determined by whether ethics enforcement mechanisms actually begin to function. It will depend on whether President Trump, and his appointees, follow through on his pledge to “drain the swamp” and whether House Republicans end their assault on the Office of Congressional Ethics, and instead get behind real reform.

Meanwhile, Meeks is up to his old tricks.

The Washington Free Beacon reported on January 30 that two of his campaign committees have paid a total of $168,000 since 2008 to a “company” owned by the wife of the chief of …

Information Tech Corporations and the Left: A Dangerous Liaison

To the titans of Silicon Valley, November 8, 2016 was a date that forever shall live in infamy.  The election of Donald Trump as president posed an unprecedented threat to their campaign to transform America into a permanent global sanctuary.  Information technology leaders have been on the warpath since President Trump’s January 27 90-day ban on immigration and refugee entry from seven terrorist-sponsoring (or terrorist-controlled) Muslim-majority nations, an executive order nixed a week later by a Seattle federal judge.  That ruling triggered a quick appeal by the administration, and just as quickly, an amicus brief submitted to the appeals court by around 100 tech executives in support of the lower court ruling.  Significant as the immigration angle is, another and perhaps less recognized issue looms:  the willful transformation of corporations into a de facto branch of the federal government.

With increasing commitment, U.S. corporations over the last few decades have …

Starbucks’ Refugees Move Costs Them With Customers

PHOTO: sillygwailo/Creative Commons

Starbucks and its CEO Howard Schultz are known well for wading in to divisive political issues and in support for liberal candidates like Hillary Clinton, yet it never seems to cost them significantly in either sales or stock price.

Even when Schultz told shareholders to sell if they don’t agree with corporation stances on issues like gay marriage, customers and investors have largely stuck around.

That trend likely won’t change after the latest controversial stance that Schultz took, utilizing the policies of the company he leads (until early April, when he steps down) to advance his political goals. But some cracks are showing with this one.

Last month Schultz announced the company would hire 10,000 refugees in its stores around the world, after President Trump’s executive order that temporarily prohibited visits from citizens of seven nations that showed a heightened terror threat to …

Clueless Tech CEOs Savage Trump Immigration Policies; Ignore Shareholders and Customers

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg

When it comes to President Donald Trump and knee-jerk reactions to policy decisions without gathering all the facts, it seems the mostly liberal CEOs of the best-known Silicon Valley companies can’t help themselves. They would rather shoot from the lip first, taking their cues from all the president’s leftist enemies, instead of gathering all the evidence and speaking responsibly on the issues – if at all.

It happened again over the weekend, this time in response to the President’s executive order that temporarily suspended the admission of foreign nationals into the United States from seven countries – Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen – which are viewed as sources of potential threats, based upon security reviews by Obama administration officials. The reason for the suspension, Trump explained, is so appropriate security agencies that normally screen foreign nationals entering the country would have the time and …

Google is the Threat to Our Civil Liberties, Not Trump

Eric Schmidt at Hillary ‘victory’ party

Eric Schmidt, the executive chairman of Google’s parent company Alphabet, told Google employees last week that the Trump administration is “going to do evil things as they have done in the immigration area and perhaps some others.” Schmidt is putting Google’s money where his mouth is by contributing $2 million to the American Civil Liberties Union and three other groups opposing Trump immigration policies.

It is ironic that a new Google policy that allows the company to collect even more information on users is getting far less attention. The new policy is only the latest evidence that Google, and sister companies like YouTube, represent an increasingly serious threat not only to personal privacy but also to civil liberties.

Privacy advocates have raised the alarm about the new policy that was launched in June under the guise of empowering users to see what information Google …

Trump and the Unions: How Close of a Working Relationship?

President Donald Trump and AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka would seem to have nothing in common, save for the first four letters of their last names.  Yet each shares a conviction that government must protect domestic industry.  This common interest became clear on Monday when Trump signed an executive order withdrawing the U.S. from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement and later met that day with union officials.  Trumka, who during the 2016 campaign had called Trump a “fraud,” now praised his nemesis though without mentioning his name.  Teamster President James Hoffa called Trump’s order “the first step toward fixing 30 years of bad trade policies that have cost working Americans millions of good-paying jobs.”  One asks:  Is there an alliance in the making?  The answer:  Probably not.

There can be no doubt that Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, unexpected as it was successful, altered some basic “Right vs. Left” assumptions about …

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