Union Corruption Update

Former Employee of Kentucky Steelworkers Local Pleads Guilty; Sentenced

Steelworkers logoOn December 15, Dawn Colley, former office employee of United Steelworkers Local 8-719, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky to concealing her theft of funds from the Ashland, Ky. union.  She then was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay $4,200 in restitution, on top of the $7,446 she previously had paid, plus a $25 special assessment.  Colley had been indicted in October for embezzling $7,201.  The actions follow a probe by the U.S. Labor Department’s Office of Labor-Management Standards.

Louisville Teamster Boss Sentenced for Theft, Cover-Up

Teamsters logoOn December 10, Jerry Vincent, formerly president of International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 783, was sentenced in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky to six months of home confinement and three years of probation for embezzling $17,272.84 from the Louisville union.   He also was ordered to pay $22,251 in restitution, a sum representing an unearned vacation advance as well as the stolen funds.  Vincent had pleaded guilty last August to one count of embezzlement and 13 counts of falsifying union records following his July 2014 indictment.  The actions follow an investigation by the U.S. Labor Department’s Office of Labor-Management Standards.

Top Ten Union Corruption Stories of the Year

Top Ten logoAs in 2014, union leaders last year directed much of their energies toward maximizing political and legal advantage.  And they scored tangible victories.  President Barack Obama, now in his last year in office, is without question the best White House friend of organized labor in decades.  Among other things, unions won major cases before the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), with its built-in 3-2 Democratic Party majority.  And the Teamsters achieved its long-sought goal of release from federal control established following a 1989 civil racketeering settlement.  Yet organized labor also experienced its share of setbacks, especially in the courts.  And they received lots of unwanted exposure for embezzlement and fraud.  As far as rank and file members are concerned, the most pressing problem is the growing possibility that their pension plans will be depleted.     

NYC Steelworkers Ex-Boss Sentenced for Hiding Thefts

Steelworkers logoConsidering the nature of his offenses, Juan “Alex” Cedeno should consider himself fortunate.  On December 10, Cedeno, former president of United Steelworkers Local 4-318, was sentenced in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York to three years of probation and 250 hours of community service for concealing his thefts from the Queens, N.Y. union, which since has moved to Edison, N.J.  He also was ordered to pay $33,583 in restitution and a $25 special assessment.  Cedeno had pled guilty last March after being arrested and charged in May 2014.  The actions follow a probe by the U.S. Labor Department’s Office of Labor-Management Standards and Employee Benefits Security Administration.

Security Officers Local President in Pennsylvania Sentenced

UGSOA logoHoward Royal stole from his state employees union.  Now he owes some time to his state.  On December 14, Royal, former president of United Government Security Officers of America (UGSOA) Local 304, was sentenced in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania to six months of house arrest followed by six months of supervised probation for wire fraud in connection with thefts of $66,982.02 from the Harrisburg union.  He had pleaded guilty last July.  The actions follow an investigation by the Labor Department’s Office of Labor-Management Standards.

Northern Indiana Steelworkers President Indicted for Theft

Steelworkers logoOn December 9, Donn Pendergrass, president of United Steelworkers Local 1191, was indicted in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Indiana on one count of embezzling $33,435 in funds from the Mishawaka, Ind.-based union, which represented workers at the now-closed Allegheny Technologies metal casting plant in LaPorte.  The indictment follows an investigation by the U.S. Labor Department’s Office of Labor-Management Standards.

Steelworkers Local President in West Virginia Pleads Guilty

Steelworkers logoOn December 11, James Coffey, former president of United Steelworkers Local 5-887, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of West Virginia to one count of embezzling funds in the amount of $6,260 from the Newell, W.Va.-based union.  Coffey, a resident of Bergholz, Ohio, had been indicted last October for stealing $7,098 in union funds.  The actions follow a probe by the U.S. Labor Department’s Office of Labor-Management Standards.

Teamsters President in Florida Indicted for Theft, Records Fraud

Teamsters logoOn December 8, Robert Tuttle, former president of International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 173, was indicted in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida on four counts of embezzlement totaling $4,857 from the Bradenton-based union and one count of false record-keeping.  The indictment follows a probe by the Labor Department’s Office of Labor-Management Standards.

Letter Carriers President in Texas Charged with Credit Card Fraud

Letter Carriers logoOn December 3, Stanley Buchanan, former president of National Association of Letter Carriers Branch 493, was charged in Smith County (Tex.) Court with unauthorized use of a credit card issued by the Tyler-based union in the amount of $7,776.  The indictment follows an investigation by the Labor Department’s Office of Labor-Management Standards.

Upstate New York Elevator Constructors Business Agent Charged

Elevator Constructors logoOn December 1, Patrick Rommevaux, former business representative for International Union of Elevator Constructors Local 62, was charged in Onondaga County Court, N.Y. with one count of grand larceny in the amount of $16,545 from the Syracuse union.  He then pleaded guilty.  The actions follow an investigation by the U.S. Labor Department’s Office of Labor-Management Standards.

Syndicate content