Sonia Sotomayor

Supreme Court Sides with Dissenting New Haven Firemen; Overturns Sotomayor

U.S. Supreme Court buildingThough uncomfortably close, it was a victory for liberty. By a 5-4 margin, the U.S. Supreme Court today in Ricci v. DeStefano overturned a Second Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that defended a local government race-based job promotion policy. The City of New Haven, Connecticut, the High Court said, erred when it scrapped the results of a written exam designed for promoting local firefighters because the highest scorers did not include any blacks. The ruling is especially noteworthy because it rebukes Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor, who wrote the circuit court decision. Whether the case will be used to bar race-based quotas in the future, however, is less certain.

Sotomayor, Sharpton and 'Post-Racial' Claptrap

Sharpton/Holder photoThis picture of Al Sharpton talking to Attorney General Eric Holder was taken yesterday at the White House where Barack Obama announced his nomination of Sonia Sotomayor for the Supreme Court. The White House has been giving Sharpton a surprisingly high profile lately. Al has practically moved in.

Barack Obama was supposed to be our first “post-racial” president. After all, he won the Democratic primaries and the general election with white votes. Obama’s supporters argued that Obama was just the leader to move the country beyond race. Sharpton’s mentor Jesse Jackson became so flustered at this possibility that he wished to cut off Obama’s privates.

Obama Nominee Supports Racial Quotas in Civil Service Hiring

Sonia Sotomayor photoSonia Sotomayor, nominated by President Obama this morning to be our nation's next Supreme Court Justice, is being hailed as an old-fashioned American success story. Born to Bronx, New York, Puerto Rican parents of modest means and educated at Princeton University and Yale Law School, in 1992 she became a federal district judge and in 1998 a federal appeals judge. Obama chose her in part because of his stated preference for life experiences that bring "empathy" to the bench. He thus far has sidestepped the issue of whether he favors mandatory racial and ethnic hiring quotas. But given Sotomayor's position in a class-action appeals case originating in Connecticut, he may not have that luxury much longer.

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