Sharpton Washington March Offers Preview of Political Intimidation

When it comes to organizing rallies on short notice, Al Sharpton has few peers.  The ability of Reverend Al to generate a crowd through his New York City-based nonprofit National Action Network (NAN) was in evidence last Saturday morning, January 14, in the nation’s capital.  Billed as the “We Shall Not Be Moved March on Washington,” the rain-soaked event (see photo) drew thousands of participants, overwhelmingly black, many of whom arrived by chartered bus.  The stated purpose of this grievance convention, timed for Martin Luther King Day and the Donald Trump inauguration, was to pressure Congress into resisting the new administration.  Accordingly, the march offered a platform for ritual denunciations of enemies of blacks, Hispanics, gays and other “disenfranchised” groups, and calls for new laws to protect their members.  If lawmakers are smart, they’ll take a pass.

Al Sharpton for more than a decade has become a political player of …

Labor Unions and Al Sharpton: An Enduring Partnership

Labor unions in this country are engines of egalitarian policy and its most potent political vehicle, the Democratic Party.  As the party platform heavily overlaps with that of demagogic black identity politicians, most of all, Al Sharpton, labor leaders have become prominent supporters of Sharpton and his New York-based nonprofit, National Action Network (NAN).  The bond was very much in evidence at Manhattan’s Sheraton Times Square Hotel last Friday afternoon on a discussion panel, “The State of American Labor Unions Today,” one of nearly 30 held during the NAN annual convention of April 13-16.  Despite a couple of key no-shows, the speakers gave the mostly black crowd what it wanted:  a rousing call for union organizing, welfare state expansion and “anti-racist” activism.

Labor and civil rights activists long have marched hand in hand, literally as well as figuratively.  Unions provided ammunition for civil rights federal legislation of a half-century or …