George Soros’ New Plan for Globalism and Crony Capitalism

Soros photoWhen George Soros invests $50 million to revolutionize the way Americans think about a certain issue, it would normally be deemed newsworthy. Not so with the formation of the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET). Three months after a summit in New York state last July, Soros pledged $50 million to INET, which promises “to promote changes in economic theory and practice” by “providing the proper guidance” to “the next generation.” 

Despite its name, its philosophy is nearly a century old. The group blames the economic crisis on free market capitalism and promotes a return to the theories of John Maynard Keynes. INET hosted its inaugural conference April 8-10 at King’s College, Keynes’ school, and called on economists to “apply the same Keynesian courage and innovation” to ending the worldwide recession.

That conference’s proceedings reveal INET is applying its talent to “contracting” the U.S. economy, redistributing its wealth, and creating …

Analysis: Obama Stimulus Plan Invokes Keynes

Keynes photoThe $787 billion economic stimulus package passed and signed into law last month had any number of co-sponsors in Congress, but in a real sense its main author was someone deceased for more than 60 years:  John Maynard Keynes.  The measure, and proposals subsequent to it, represent a tribute to a highly flawed, though highly original thinker.  They also speak of a larger ongoing and recent pendulum shift in theory and policy. 


Much has been written, and deservedly so, about President Obama’s sense of racial grievance; his radicalism; his circle of Chicago friends and fixers; and his intense identification with Abraham Lincoln.  Yet only recently that level of attention has been given to his worldview, all but in name Keynesian, to the current economic crisis.  The president and his neo-Keynesian top economic advisers – Lawrence Summers, Timothy Geithner and Christina Romer – have