natural gas

Apple CEO Tim Cook Contradicts Himself with Lisa Jackson Hire

Tim Cook photoAfter last week’s announcement that Apple would hire former EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson to handle environmental issues, a series of videos released  last week by Duke University were amusingly timed.

The six clips featured interviews with CEO Tim Cook, who succeeded the late, popular Steve Jobs, and were released by his alma mater’s Fuqua School of Business, where he earned his MBA. Cook had returned for a class reunion in April and while there Duke recorded discussions about topics such as inspiration, career planning, intuition, and other aspects of business management.

More Federal Officials Don't Like Natural Gas— This Time in Gas Rich Zone

Dan Arvizu

As Americans grow increasingly skeptical about global warming, and the availability of shale oil and natural gas is greater than ever in the U.S., a federal official based in Colorado says the climate threat is so dire that electric utilities should not plan long-term for the development of natural gas power plants.

More Controversy Engulfs NY Times Shale Gas Reporting

NY Times building photoThis week the New York Times again ran a story calling into question the credibility of reporter Ian Urbina's June 27th article, "Insiders Sound an Alarm Amid a Natural Gas Rush," which claims the quickly emerging shale gas industry is similar to a Ponzi scheme.

It appears Urbina crossed the line into sensational journalism with his baseless claims by failing to conduct proper background checks, and his tendency to overstate the credentials of anonymous sources. This problems with his reporting apparently have driven a wedge between Times editors trying to justify the story, and those concerned over the long-term repercussions for the paper.

NY Times Ombudsman Critical of Shale Gas 'Bubble' Stories

NY Times building photoOn July 7, we asked New York Times ombudsman Arthur Brisbane to look at the newspaper's front-page series on natural gas by reporter Ian Urbina, who alleged that the sector is in the grips of a speculative bubble. We specified a number of apparent ethical problems with Urbina's methods and sources.

In Sunday's paper, Brisbane addressed the central concern raised by us and many others - that Urbina ignored the fact that production of natural gas from domestic shale deposits is booming. Brisbane wrote:

NY Times Asked to Investigate Shale Gas 'Bubble' Series

New York Times photoNLPC today asked the New York Times ombudsman to review the newspaper's front-page series on natural gas published last week. The articles by Ian Urbina alleged that there is a speculative bubble in natural gas drilling. We have identified a number of apparent ethical problems with Urbina's methods and sources.

Here is the complete text of my letter to The New York Times ombudsman Arthur Brisbane, whose actual title is Public Editor:

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