Report Shows Missouri Taxpayers Subsidize Public-Sector Unions

Union compensationUnions, even those representing government employees, are private organizations.  Yet a new report from the Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) reveals that taxpayers in one state effectively are being forced to cover some of the costs of public-sector union official business.  The study, authored by CEI labor policy analyst Trey Kovacs and titled, “A Remedy for Taxpayer Giveaway to Unions” (March 25, 2015), in the face of considerable resistance, dug up clear evidence that state and local government agencies in Missouri are subsidizing public-sector unions during working hours without loss of member pay.  These “release time” clauses, whether or not built into collective bargaining agreements, are at odds with the public interest, deceptively costly, and almost certainly illegal.

It is little secret that public-sector unions have eclipsed their private-sector counterparts in terms of membership density and political influence.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 6.6 percent …

Corporations Embrace Obama EPA Emission Restrictions

Ceres logoGlobal warming alarmists have spent time and money that spans decades and has cost billions of dollars, yet all their tactics and messaging haven’t moved the public-concern meter above “who cares?” So-called “climate change” does not even register near the top of environmental problems that most Americans worry about – much less among all policy issues – according to Gallup polling.

That doesn’t mean the fear-mongers have given up, of course, as the latest effort by environmental pressure group Ceres illustrates. The activist group – which exerts its influence via shareholder activism (claiming $10 trillion in assets) in pursuit of their definition of a “sustainable” global economy – last week sent a letter endorsed by 223 companies to President Obama, in support of EPA’s controversial proposed standard for existing power plants to limit carbon dioxide emissions. Some of the largest and most recognized corporations signed on, including Adidas, …

New Report Highlights Costs of Mandatory Collective Bargaining

Collective bargainingUnions do more than raise labor costs of employers with whom they negotiate. They also reduce wages and job growth in states where they are most prevalent. That’s the conclusion of a new monograph published by the Washington, D.C.-based Competitive Enterprise Institute titled “The Unintended Consequences of Collective Bargaining” (see pdf). The authors, economist Lowell Gallaway (Ohio University) and law student Jonathan Robe, calculate union-associated “deadweight loss,” on a state-by-state basis, over several decades. They concluded that a relatively high proportion of unionization, or union density, correlates with high rates of job loss. This suggests that by forcing employers to the bargaining table, federal labor law depresses entry-level worker prospects. It also suggests that state Right to Work laws mitigate this outcome.

Unionism in this country, note the authors, goes back well over a century. The American Federation of Labor, the precursor to the AFL-CIO, for example, was …

EPA’s Emissions Rule Would Likely Increase Carbon Dioxide

enhanced oil recovery

On the heels of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s official position that human-generated carbon dioxide is “extremely likely” the “dominant” cause of warming since the mid-20th Century, the Environmental Protection Agency’s simultaneously proposed rule to limit such emissions from fossil-fueled power plants is contradictory.

EPA has wholeheartedly sold the global warming “scientific consensus” justification for CO2 limits to the public, and as a result has conducted a “war against coal” in conjunction with environmental pressure groups for years. And President Obama – who was most recently vocal about it in June – called for the elimination of tax breaks for “Big Oil” and has repeatedly expressed opposition to the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.

So what’s the contradiction?

Under the proposed EPA rule, newly built coal-fired power plants would have to eliminate 40 percent of their carbon dioxide emissions by using not-ready-for-prime-time capture and …

Lisa Jackson Hires Lawyer for Email Concealment Fiasco

Lisa Jackson phptpIn a sign her troubles have undergone a significant expansion, the Washington Free Beacon reported last week that former EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson has hired a lawyer as new details of her use of private email accounts to conduct official government business were revealed.

The agency and its previous head have still breathed easy despite months of inquiries and Freedom of Information Act requests from Chris Horner of the Competitive Enterprise Institute and American Tradition Institute. Jackson and enviro-crats have been shielded by colleagues’ efforts to block access to records, delay their delivery, or conceal damning information with redactions. Nevertheless the indefatigable Horner has continued to pepper the agency with new requests from new angles almost every time he discovers a new hint of malfeasance revealed from previous requests.

What seems to have alarmed Jackson – who is now Apple’s top environmental officer – is the revelation that …

Why Does Apple Want Lisa Jackson and Her Ethical Cloud?

Lisa Jackson phptpApple’s hiring of former EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson last week gives her a soft landing place, after she fled her cabinet role spurred by a flurry of evasions and deceits over alias email accounts she and her underlings used to hide correspondence from the public. Her would-be successor, Gina McCarthy, seeks to be confirmed under the same cloud.

It’s unclear why Apple would want or need Jackson, as its (faux) environmentalist credibility is already well established, and the Mac maker already boasts the top figurehead of eco-figureheads on its board of directors, Al Gore.

That’s not to say the evasive, deceptive Jackson isn’t a fit for Apple, a company with a reputation for falsely claiming “green”-friendly policies when the truth shows otherwise. Also like Jackson, the Cupertino, Calif. clan isn’t shy about piling on sky-high costs for the massive amounts of electricity it needs for services like iCloud …

EPA Transparency Still In Question After Release from Jackson’s Alias Email Account

Lisa JacksonThe emails released by the Environmental Protection Agency pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act request, that sought communications under a nom de plume for Administrator Lisa Jackson, only heightened the agency’s obfuscation according to the man who went to court to demand them.

On Monday EPA made public approximately 2,100 emails (far short of the promised 3,000) from Jackson’s disguised account, which she used under the alias “Richard Windsor.” Chris Horner of the Competitive Enterprise Institute, who had discovered the administrator’s fake identity while researching his book The Liberal War on Transparency, said the contents of the messages were unrevealing and contained useless information such as Google alerts and Washington Post news digests. According to CNSNews.com, the release is the first of an expected four batches that is expected to contain 12,000 emails from Jackson’s alternative account.

“Perhaps seeking to take the air out of a …

Disguised Emails Another Example of Obama Disregard for Public Accountability

Lisa JacksonCongressional overseers seek to determine whether the cabinet agencies under President Obama (specifically the Environmental Protection Agency), who promised “an unprecedented level of openness in government,” have hidden communications about official business with the use of private and alias email accounts.

Michigan Rep. Fred Upton, chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Chairman Cliff Stearns (R-Fla.), wrote in a Dec. 13 letter to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson “that you describe fully the nature and extent of this practice.” Chris Horner, author of The Liberal War on Transparency, first discovered the existence of the accounts as he researched the book. He and his colleagues at the Competitive Enterprise Institute have sued for records from the alias accounts.

At the moment the concern is over transparency, although there are countless potentially embarrassing issues that could have been addressed by Jackson and others …